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Blue Square Red Star

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Blue Square Red Star

Students will use the relationships between equations to solve for two variables.

Bottles of Soda

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Bottles of Soda

Students will use the structure of a system of three visual equations to find the value of a variable.

Constructing Systems

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Constructing Systems

The goal of these activities is to support students in understanding how to identify quantities and relationships within various situations and use those quantities and relationships to create equations, tables of values, and graphs, then use those representations to solve problems related to the situations.

End of Unit Assessment (Algebra I, Unit 4)

Algebra I
Unit 4: Linear Equations and Inequalities in Two Variables
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End of Unit Assessment (Algebra I, Unit 4)

After this unit, how prepared are your students for the end-of-course Regents examination?  The end of unit assessment is designed to surface how students understand the mathematics in the unit.  It includes spiralled multiple choice and constructed response questions, comparable to those on the end-of-course Regents examination.  A rich task, that allows for multiple entry points and authentic assessment of student learning, may be available for some units and can be included as part of the end of unit assessment.  All elements of the end of unit assessment are aligned to the NYS Mathematics Learning Standards and PARCC Model Frameworks prioritization. 

(Equations in) Squares and Circles

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(Equations in) Squares and Circles

Use the structure of a set of systems of equations to find relationships between the equations and to use those relationships to find the value of a variable in the system.

Equivalent Systems

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Equivalent Systems

Use the structure of a system of equations to match it to another equivalent system of equations.

Graphs and Situations

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Graphs and Situations

The objective is to focus on the relationship between the type of situation and a graph, in particular how the situation defines the constraints and type of expected solution, and how this constraint is represented in the graph.

Graphs and Tables

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Graphs and Tables

Use the structure of a set of graphs and tables representing systems of equations to make matches between the graphs and tables.

Hidden Solution

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Hidden Solution

Use the structure of an diagram to find a solution to a graphical systems of equations that is hidden from view.

Instructions for Picking Apples

Algebra I
Unit 4: Linear Equations and Inequalities in Two Variables
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Instructions for Picking Apples

This page contains instructions on how to use Picking Apples as the Unit 4 initial task to find out what your students already know about finding costs from given rules.

Re-engagement Support (Algebra I, Unit 4)

Algebra I
Unit 4: Linear Equations and Inequalities in Two Variables
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Re-engagement Support (Algebra I, Unit 4)

Re-engagement means going back to a familiar problem or task and looking at it again in different ways, with a new lens, or going deeper into the mathematics. This is often done by showing examples of student work and providing prompts to help students think about the mathematical ideas differently. This guide provides more information on how to design re-engagement lessons for your students, which you can use at any time during a unit, where you think it will be helpful for students to revisit a specific mathematical idea before moving on.

Solving Linear Equations in Two Variables

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Solving Linear Equations in Two Variables

A Classroom Challenge (aka formative assessment lesson) is a classroom-ready lesson that supports formative assessment. The lesson’s approach first allows students to demonstrate their prior understandings and abilities in employing the mathematical practices, and then involves students in resolving their own difficulties and misconceptions through structured discussion.